Constitution of Greece

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The Constitution of Greece is the codified supreme law of the Icon-Greece.png Hellenic Republic of Greece. It provides the framework for the organization of the Greek Government. The document outlines the two main branches of the government: the legislative branch with a unicameral Congress and an executive branch led by the President. Besides providing for the organization of these branches, the Constitution carefully outlines which powers each branch may exercise.

Currently, the Constitution isn't officially used, but most of the articles are still applied and is kept for historical reference.

History

The Constitution was drafted by John Daker of the Greek Republic Resistance following the removal of Capelli King as President. Many of King's late policies were heavily damaging to Greece, and the Resistance party pledged to prevent such policies from being enacted in the future. The Constitution was built on the suggestions of many Resistance members, from party officials to simple party members.

Text

In the name of the Holy and Consubstantial and Indivisible Trinity
THE CONGRESS OF THE HELLENES RESOLVES

Article I - Basic Provisions

Section I - Form of Government

Clause I - Basis of Government
I. The form of government of Greece shall be a congressional republic, which a President of the Republic shall lead.
II. Popular sovereignty shall be the foundation of government.
III. All powers of government shall be directed by the People and serve the interests of the People and Nation.
IV. This Constitution shall be the highest law of Greece and shall be added upon and revised as necessary to ensure the successful operation of the Government.
Clause II - Obligations of Government
I. The protection of the rights and liberties of the People of Greece shall be the fundamental obligation of government.
II. To ensure the protection of the Will of the People, Government shall prepare and hold elections for President of the Republic on the first of each month, and local Government shall prepare and hold elections for Mayor on the twentieth of each month.

Section II - Terms Defined

Clause III - Terms Defined
I. “Government” is defined as an institution, composed of an elected President of the Republic (herein “President of the Republic”, “President”) and Congress, elected Mayors, and other advisors and councillors appointed as the President, Mayors, and Congress see fit within the bounds of the law.
II. “Person” is defined as any human being having reached the age of majority.
a. “People” is defined as a number of Persons.
b. “People of Greece”, “Citizens of Greece”, and other variations thereof are defined as those People living in and holding citizenship in Greece.
III. “State” is defined as any foreign body, holding territory, possessing a population and Government, and having sovereignty within its territory.
IV. “Majority” is defined as a simple majority of the body described.
V. “Supermajority” is defined as two-thirds of all members of Congress.
VI. “Term”, with regard to Presidents, Mayors, and members of Congress, is defined as the one-month period during which an elected official holds office.
VII. “Quorum” is defined as half the number of Congressmen, rounded to the nearest whole number, added by one.

Article II - Individual and Social Rights and Liberties

Clause IV - Basic Provisions

I. The Government of Greece shall not establish, provide for the support of, or enforce any directive, law, statute, agency, or company that deprives the People of Greece of any right or liberty described in this article.
II. If the Government shall violate clause 3.1, the People of Greece shall have the duty and responsibility to resist any such act of Government.

Clause V - Rights and Liberties

I. All men and women of Greece shall be equal before the law, and no provision shall benefit one person over another based on race, creed, color, national origin, sex, political affiliation, or beliefs.
II. It shall be the right of all People of Greece to conduct their lives and personality to their desires, to pursue happiness, to participate in the social, economic, and political spheres of Greece, and to live freely within the bounds of the law.
III. The People of Greece shall have the right to assemble peaceably and associate with one another on any basis.
a. Assemblies of the People of Greece are extended the same rights as are extended to Greek Citizens alone.
IV. Every citizen of Greece capable of bearing arms shall have the right to do so and shall contribute to the defense of Greece shall it be required.
V. Every Person shall have the right to disseminate his or her thoughts freely in any manner allowed by law.

Clause VI - Exceptions

I. Persons found guilty of crimes against Greece by the Congress may not hold the political office of any nature within Greece.

Article III - Organization and Functions of Government

Section I - Organization

Clause VII - Government Structure
I. Government shall be composed of a Congress and led by a President of the Republic.
Clause VIII - President of the Republic
I. The People of Greece shall elect the President of the Republic
II. The election of a President shall last for a full term.
Clause IX - Congress
I. The People of Greece shall elect members of Congress.
II. The election of a member of Congress shall last for a full term.
III. Following its selection, Congress shall elect one member, by simple majority, to serve as Speaker of the Congress.

Section II - Functions of Government

Clause X - Functions of the President
I. The President of the Republic shall have the power to suggest legislation to Congress.
II. The President is obligated to uphold the Constitution of Greece above all other laws, statutes, and orders.
III. The President shall have the power to uphold all laws, statutes, and orders passed by Congress.
IV. The President shall have the power to assemble a Cabinet of advisors and officials to assist with the administration of the Government.
V. The President shall have the power to engage in diplomacy with foreign States and to appoint diplomats.
a. The President shall have the power to declare Persons, including foreign diplomats, personae non gratae, and shall have the power to recall from any State any Greek Person or diplomat so declared.
VI. The President shall have the power to establish and enforce trade agreements.
VII. The President may ask Congress, in cases of clear and present danger to Greece or Greek People abroad or to allies of Greece, to issue a declaration of War against a foreign State.
a. The President may not wage war without supermajority approval by Congress.
b. In case of a foreign State’s declaration of war against Greece, the President may direct soldiers and wage a defensive war without Congressional approval.
VIII. The President shall have no powers other than those explicitly granted to him by the Constitution.
Clause XI - Functions of Congress
I. Congress shall debate and vote to enact or reject legislation suggested by the President.
II. Congress shall have the power to debate and vote to enact or reject legislation suggested by members of Congress.
III. Congress shall have the power to, with a majority vote, recall officials from the President’s Cabinet.
IV. Congress shall have the power to approve all treaties that concern Greece.
V. Congress shall have the power to, in cases of clear and present danger to Greece or Greek People abroad or allies of Greece, issue a declaration of War against a foreign State.
a. All declarations of War must be approved by a supermajority of Congress.
VI. Congress shall have the power to demand the printing and issuance of currency.
a. Currency printed by the Government shall be legal tender for all debts, public and private.
b. All legislation concerning the power to print and issue currency must be approved by a supermajority of Congress.
i. In cases when a supermajority cannot be reached, the legislation shall be rejected.
VII. Congress shall have the power to levy taxes on industry, imports, sales, and income.
VIII. Congress shall have the power to make addenda to this Constitution.
IX. Congress shall have the power to make laws or statutes that shall be necessary and proper for the execution of the foregoing powers.
Clause XII - Restrictions
I. The President and Congress shall not suggest legislation that would violate the Constitution.
a. Any legislation that violates the Constitution shall not be required to be enforced by any body.
II. Congress must make all legislation brought before it public prior to holding a vote.
a. The People of Greece, if finding fault with an article of legislation, may petition Congress to reject that article of legislation.
i. If one-tenth of Greece’s population signs a petition in opposition of an article of legislation, an open referendum must be held to enact or reject that article of legislation.
III. Congress must make the votes of its members public.
IV. Congress must hold quorum to vote on legislation.
a. The President may compel members of Congress to appear on the floor in the absence of a quorum.
V. Members of Congress may serve no more than three consecutive terms.
VI. A President of the Republic may serve no more than four consecutive terms.

Article IV - Special Provisions

Clause XIII - Constitutional Addenda

I. Addenda to the Constitution may not revise or alter the meanings of Clauses 1 through 5, 10.7, 11.5, 11.6, 12.1, 12.2, 13, or 14.
a. Addenda to the Constitution may not contradict the aforementioned Clauses.
II. Addenda to the Constitution must be approved by a supermajority of Congress to be enacted.
a. Failure to achieve supermajority will result in the addendum being rejected.

Clause XIV - Lawful Resistance and Impeachment

I. Impeachment of a President who violates this Constitution shall be made possible by a vote of the Congress.
a. A supermajority of Congress must vote to impeach for the impeachment process to proceed.
b. Once a President has been impeached, it shall be the duty of the Congress to provide evidence of a violation of the Constitution.
i. If Congress shall be unable to provide evidence of such a violation, the impeached President shall resume his duties as outlined in Clause X.
ii. If Congress is able to provide such evidence and finds the evidence substantial and damning, the impeached President shall be removed from office and the Speaker of the Congress shall assume the duties of President until an election can be held.

Clause XV - Scorched Earth Prevention Provisions

I. Declarations of War may not be made within five days of a Presidential election.
a. Declarations of War of a defensive nature may be made following a declaration of War against Greece within five days of a Presidential election.
II. Congressional powers outlined in Clause 11.6 shall be suspended during the week leading up to a Presidential election.
III. Congress must approve all withdrawals from the national treasury by a supermajority.
a. No more than one hundred gold, in total, may be withdrawn from the national treasury in the week leading up to a Presidential election.